Head

Prof. Uriya Shavit
Prof. Uriya Shavit

Uriya Shavit, Full Professor at Tel Aviv University, specializes in Jewish-Muslim relations in Europe, among other fields. He is the author of nine academic books and several dozen academic articles, as well three novels and six books for young readers.

https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uriya_Shavit
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uriya_Shavit

Founding Head

Prof. Dina Porat
Prof. Dina Porat

Dina Porat, Founder and former Head of the Kantor Center, is Professor emerita of Jewish History at Tel Aviv University and Chief Historian of Yad Vashem. She initiated and continues to serve as the chief author of the annual reports on antisemitism published by the Center. She authored and edited fifteen books related inter alia to the Holocaust and its memory.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dina_Porat
https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dina_Porat

Project Manager

Dr. Giovanni Quer
Dr. Giovanni Quer

Giovanni Quer holds a Ph.D. in International Studies (2011, University of Trento) and an LL.M (2007, University of Trento). He has a background in human rights and specializes in the study of modern Islam and Jewish-Muslim relations.

Media Director

Carl Yonker
Dr. Carl Yonker

Carl Yonker holds a Ph.D. in Middle East History (2020, Tel Aviv University) and is the author of The Rise and Fall of Greater Syria (2021, De Gruyter). He is the Center's media director, managing the correspondence and communication with the Center’s contacts in Israel and abroad.

Researcher

Dr. Inna Shtakser
Dr. Inna Shtakser

Dr. Inna Shtakser taught at The University of Texas at Austin (TX, US), Dalhousie University (NS, Canada), Tel Aviv University (Israel), and Tulane University (LA, US). Her book, The Making of Jewish Revolutionaries in the Pale: Poverty, Work, Community and the Transformation of Identity during the 1905-1907 Russian Revolution, was published by Palgrave Macmillan in 2014. Her published articles address the cultural history of Jewish working-class radicalism, self-defense against pogroms, political violence, and the anarchist movement, all in the Russian Empire.